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Arizona Judicial Branch


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2017 Distinguished Service Award Winners


Programs  2017 Program 2016 Program  2015 Program  2014 Program 


Administration of Justice Award

Mr. Gary Krcmarik undertook a complex and vital access to justice project over the last year. Coconino County, in partnership with the AOC, the AmeriCorps program and the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education launched a virtual legal resource center, the first of its kind in Arizona. Much more than a website, AzCourtHelp.org is a place to go for concise legal help on everything from evictions and protective orders to family court and court forms. The virtual aspect is that Coconino County’s Law Library hosts a rotating schedule of legal talks and clinics that are webcast to computer users anywhere.  Krcmarik currently serves as the Court Administrator for Coconino County, having served in this position for twenty-two years. Prior to joining Coconino County, he worked in the limited and general jurisdiction trial courts of the State of California for more than fifteen years.  In addition to the AzCourtHelp project, Krcmarik regularly makes the trip down the mountain from Flagstaff to serve on numerous committees.  He is a member of the Arizona Judicial Council, the Fiduciary Board, the Commission on Technology, the General Jurisdiction Case Management Steering Committee, and the Court Improvement Advisory Workgroup. He formerly served on the Committee on Superior Court. 


Outstanding Pro Bono Service Award

Mr. Jay Zweig practices employment law and commercial litigation at Bryan Cave. Zweig has more than 25 years of experience representing private businesses, public corporations and governments in avoiding and resolving employment law disputes.  Zweig serves as Bryan Cave’s pro bono coordinator and has handled pro bono cases for indigent and low income families and individuals throughout his career. He has provided hundreds of hours of pro bono service to the Valley of the Sun Jewish Community Center. In 2006, Zweig accepted a case through Community Legal Services’ Volunteer Lawyers Program. He represented two immigrant brothers who had been defrauded out of their family home by "equity skimmers." It took 10 years and more than 400 hours of pro bono service to finally get justice for the family. The matter was resolved and the family is back in their home. Meanwhile, he continued to take other pro bono cases, in addition to his full time legal practice at Bryan Cave.  Zweig has undertaken pro bono work through the Volunteer Lawyers Program since he became a member of the Arizona Bar. He has also served as president of the Maricopa County Bar Association and as adjunct faculty at the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law at Arizona State University.  Zweig’s commitment to his community extends beyond his legal work. He is a graduate of Valley Leadership and Greater Phoenix Leadership and has held leadership positions in other civic organizations or non-profits. 


Judge of the Year Award

Judge Michael Pollard is a pioneer willing to try new approaches in the hopes of solving problems within his community. Since 1994, Judge Pollard has served as Tucson City Magistrate. In 2008, he created Arizona's first Veterans Court specialty docket. As a US Marine Corps veteran himself, Judge Pollard has an immediate kinship with the veterans who arrive in his court. Since then, several municipal and justice courts have relied on Judge Pollard's expertise as a mentor as they set up their own Veterans Courts. Veterans Court was built on the successful specialty court model he launched in 2004 to deal with legal problems among Tucson’s homeless. Bringing community service providers together to assist veterans, the homeless, and disadvantaged individuals has paid great dividends in the Tucson community.  Judge Pollard served as member and Chair of the Arizona Supreme Court Committee on the Impact of Domestic Violence and the Courts and was actively involved in statewide judicial and domestic violence issues. He also served on the National Conference of Juvenile and Family Court Judges/Department of Justice Committee that formulated the Domestic Violence Bench Card. Judge Pollard just recently stepped down from 20 years as chair of the Supreme Court’s Court Automation Coordinating Committee. Among his many honors, Judge Pollard was inducted into the Arizona Veterans Hall of Fame in 2016 and became the first recipient of the James E. Rogers College of Law, Veterans Advocacy Clinic Battle Buddy Award. Also in 2016, he received the League of United Latin American Citizens Community Service Award. In 2015, Congressman Raul Grijalva recognized his service to veterans by reading a commendation into the Congressional Record.  He began his legal career in private practice before joining the Pima County Public Defender’s Office and later the Pima County Attorney’s Office.  He returned to private practice before the lure of public service attracted him to the Tucson City Prosecutor’s Office and, eventually, the role of magistrate.  


 Chief Justice’s Outstanding Contribution to the Arizona Courts Award

Judge Ron Reinstein’s passion for justice has guided his entire career with a specific focus on two priority areas – forensic science and balancing defendant’s rights with those of their crime victims. He has been a leader on these issues not only locally but also nationally and globally.  Reinstein has trained or coached foreign judges in forensic science, most recently judges from Costa Rica and Croatia.  He has worked tirelessly to help implement criminal justice reform.  He is recognized nationally for his expertise in forensic science and the law.  He has served as a settlement judge in high-profile cases around the state. He has helped settle high-profile cases this past year in Maricopa and Pinal Counties and is continuing to assist Coconino and Navajo counties with major cases. He is among the most respected trial judges in Arizona.  He chairs the Supreme Court’s Commission on Victims in the Courts, the Supreme Court Capital Case Oversight Committee, and the Arizona Forensic Science Advisory Committee.  He also shares his expertise in forensics, capital litigation, victims’ rights, and evidence-based sentencing in judicial education programs. He is the recipient of numerous state, local, and national awards and honors.  Reinstein retired as a judge of the Superior Court in Maricopa County after 22 years on the bench.  He now works as a judicial consultant for the Arizona Supreme Court and was appointed by the Chief Justice as Director of the Center for Evidence Based Sentencing. Judge Reinstein also serves as a consultant to the National Institute of Justice, the National Center for State Courts, the Center for Effective Public Policy, the National Forensic Science Technology Center, and the Justice Department Office for Victims of Crime.  Judge Reinstein serves on various boards, including: the Advisory Council of the National Crime Victim Law Institute; the Advisory Board of the National Clearinghouse for Science, Technology and the Law; the Board of Justice Solutions Partners, and the Board of the Justice Management Institute.  In 2014, he was appointed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to the Organization for Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) where he serves as Vice Chair of the Legal Resource Committee.


Judge of the Year Award

Judge Michael Pollard is a pioneer willing to try new approaches in the hopes of solving problems within his community. Since 1994, Judge Pollard has served as Tucson City Magistrate. In 2008, he created Arizona's first Veterans Court specialty docket. As a US Marine Corps veteran himself, Judge Pollard has an immediate kinship with the veterans who arrive in his court. Since then, several municipal and justice courts have relied on Judge Pollard's expertise as a mentor as they set up their own Veterans Courts. Veterans Court was built on the successful specialty court model he launched in 2004 to deal with legal problems among Tucson’s homeless. Bringing community service providers together to assist veterans, the homeless, and disadvantaged individuals has paid great dividends in the Tucson community.  Judge Pollard served as member and Chair of the Arizona Supreme Court Committee on the Impact of Domestic Violence and the Courts and was actively involved in statewide judicial and domestic violence issues. He also served on the National Conference of Juvenile and Family Court Judges/Department of Justice Committee that formulated the Domestic Violence Bench Card. Judge Pollard just recently stepped down from 20 years as chair of the Supreme Court’s Court Automation Coordinating Committee. Among his many honors, Judge Pollard was inducted into the Arizona Veterans Hall of Fame in 2016 and became the first recipient of the James E. Rogers College of Law, Veterans Advocacy Clinic Battle Buddy Award. Also in 2016, he received the League of United Latin American Citizens Community Service Award. In 2015, Congressman Raul Grijalva recognized his service to veterans by reading a commendation into the Congressional Record.  He began his legal career in private practice before joining the Pima County Public Defender’s Office and later the Pima County Attorney’s Office.  He returned to private practice before the lure of public service attracted him to the Tucson City Prosecutor’s Office and, eventually, the role of magistrate.  

Judge of the Year Award

Judge Michael Pollard is a pioneer willing to try new approaches in the hopes of solving problems within his community. Since 1994, Judge Pollard has served as Tucson City Magistrate. In 2008, he created Arizona's first Veterans Court specialty docket. As a US Marine Corps veteran himself, Judge Pollard has an immediate kinship with the veterans who arrive in his court. Since then, several municipal and justice courts have relied on Judge Pollard's expertise as a mentor as they set up their own Veterans Courts. Veterans Court was built on the successful specialty court model he launched in 2004 to deal with legal problems among Tucson’s homeless. Bringing community service providers together to assist veterans, the homeless, and disadvantaged individuals has paid great dividends in the Tucson community.  Judge Pollard served as member and Chair of the Arizona Supreme Court Committee on the Impact of Domestic Violence and the Courts and was actively involved in statewide judicial and domestic violence issues. He also served on the National Conference of Juvenile and Family Court Judges/Department of Justice Committee that formulated the Domestic Violence Bench Card. Judge Pollard just recently stepped down from 20 years as chair of the Supreme Court’s Court Automation Coordinating Committee. Among his many honors, Judge Pollard was inducted into the Arizona Veterans Hall of Fame in 2016 and became the first recipient of the James E. Rogers College of Law, Veterans Advocacy Clinic Battle Buddy Award. Also in 2016, he received the League of United Latin American Citizens Community Service Award. In 2015, Congressman Raul Grijalva recognized his service to veterans by reading a commendation into the Congressional Record.  He began his legal career in private practice before joining the Pima County Public Defender’s Office and later the Pima County Attorney’s Office.  He returned to private practice before the lure of public service attracted him to the Tucson City Prosecutor’s Office and, eventually, the role of magistrate.