Arizona Judicial Branch

Criminal Forms

"Restoration of Civil Rights" means that a person who has been convicted of a felony may have any civil rights (e.g., right to vote, and serve on a jury), which were lost or suspended by the felony conviction, restored.

"Designating an Undesignated Class 6 Felony as a Misdemeanor" means reducing an undesignated felony to a misdemeanor if the person had not been convicted of two felony offenses and the class 6 felony conviction was not a dangerous offense in that it did not involve the intentional or knowing infliction of serious physical injury or the discharge, use or threatening exhibition of a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument.

"Post-Conviction Relief" means the right of a person convicted of a crime to have his or her criminal conviction or sentence reviewed by a court for errors or mistakes. Sometimes post-conviction relief proceedings are called "Rule 32 Proceedings."

Form Title Form No. Instructions
Application to Restore Civil Rights, Restore Gun Rights, Set Aside Judgment of Guilt, or Request for Reconsideration - Forms and Instructions MCOC CRS300F I
Application to Restore Civil Rights After Federal Felony Conviction and Request for Reconsideration - Forms and Instructions

Form Title
Form No.
Instructions for Applying for Class 6 Undesignated Felony to be Designated a Misdemeanor

Application to Designate a Class 6 Undesignated Felony as a Misdemeanor
Order to Designate a Class 6 Undesignated Felony a Misdemeanor

Form Title Form No. Instructions
General Information About Post-Conviction Relief   CRPCR10H
Instructions: How to Complete the Forms and Steps in the Post-Conviction Relief Process
Notice of Request for Post-Conviction Relief CRPCR12F  
Petition for Post-Conviction Relief
Request for Preparation of Post-Conviction Relief Record

Form Title Form No. Instructions
Procedures: What to Do With the Motion When You Have Filled it Out and Motion Form
Request to Update Address and/or Name GN91F  

The information offered on this site is made available as a public service and is not intended to take the place of legal advice. If you do not understand something, have trouble filling out any of the forms or are not sure these forms and instructions apply to your situation, see an attorney for help. Before filing documents with the court, you might consider contacting an attorney to help guard against undesired and unexpected consequences.

Not all forms may be accepted in all Arizona courts – you should contact the superior court clerk of the court in which you will be filing to confirm the use of a particular form, determine whether any additional forms are required and verify the filing fees. The Supreme Court assumes no responsibility and accepts no liability for actions taken by users of these documents, including reliance on their contents.