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Azcourts.gov

Arizona Judicial Branch


Juvenile Intensive Probation

 Juvenile Intensive Probation Supervision (JIPS)
 

For more information contact the Arizona Supreme Court, Administrative Office of the Courts, Juvenile Justice Services Division, at (602) 452-3443 or the juvenile probation departments in individual Arizona counties. 

   
  What is JIPS? 
Who is eligible? 
Who decides who will be placed on JIPS? 
What do the participants have to do?
How does JIPS benefit the community?
Who monitors individuals on JIPS?
Who operates JIPS? 
Where do I get the JIPS Annual Report? 
Questions and County Locations for JIPS
   
  What is Juvenile Intensive Probation Supervision (JIPS)?
  Juvenile Intensive Probation Supervision (JIPS) is a program designed to divert juvenile offenders who are in need of a highly structured, closely supervised program from out-of- home placement or overcrowded institutions. The JIPS program demonstrates to offenders that probation means accountability and consequences as well as productive rehabilitative activities. Since the beginning of the program in 1987, JIPS has provided intensive supervision to thousands of Arizona juveniles who might otherwise have been removed from their home. Intensive services provided to the juvenile within the family environment, when combined with surveillance, accountability and community protection, have proven to be effective alternatives to out-of-home placement. The emphasis of JIPS is frequent surveillance, work, education, accountability and home restriction.
 

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  Who is eligible?
  Are candidates for commitment to the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections (ADJC) or out-of-home placement, or
Are in need of a highly structured, closely supervised program which emphasizes surveillance, education, work and home detention.
Have been adjudicated of a second felony offense since July 21, 1997 must either be placed on JIPS, committed to ADJC or sent to Adult Court. In addition, juveniles who are considered to be at high risk of reoffending can be placed on JIPS.
 

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  Who decides who will be placed on JIPS?
  At disposition hearings when judges decide what will happen to juveniles as a result of their criminal activity, the judge may place a juvenile in the JIPS program. The judge's decision is based in part on the facts and circumstances of the case and on the report submitted by the probation officer. Since July 1997, youth who have been adjudicated for a second felony offense must either be placed on JIPS, committed to ADJC or sent to Adult Court.
 

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  What do the participants have to do?
 

Participants in the JIPS program must comply with several specific conditions including: 
Participating in one or more of the following activities for not less than 32 hours each week: 

  • school,
  • a court-ordered treatment program,
  • employment
  • supervised community service work
  • Paying victim restitution and a monthly probation fee.
  • Living in a location approved by the JIPS team.
  • Remaining at home except to go to work, school, perform community service, or participate in special activities as approved by the probation officer.
  • Submitting to drug and alcohol tests when required by the JIPS team.
  • Completing goals and expectations set by the court.
 

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  How does JIPS benefit the community? 
  Juvenile Intensive Probation Supervision programs provide three major benefits to the community:
 
  • Close supervision of juveniles enhances compliance with terms of probation and law-abiding behavior.
  • The costs associated with placing a young offender on JIPS are considerably less than incarceration. Successful completion of JIPS can result in fewer commitments to the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections, thus reserving space for more serious offenders.
  • Juveniles participating in JIPS are required to pay victim restitution and perform valuable community service and/or work.
 

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  Who monitors individuals on JIPS?
  Offenders may be supervised by a JIPS team consisting of a juvenile probation officer and surveillance officer. A two person team may supervise a maximum of 25 youth at a time. Three-person teams may supervise a maximum of 40 youth at a time. The team members:
 
  • Keep complete identification records for each youth supervised.
  • Meet with each probationer at least four times a week and make weekly contact with the probationer's parents or guardian, school, employer, or treatment program.
  • Closely monitor each probationer's conduct including evening and weekend activities.
  • Monitor payment of restitution. 
In addition to supervising offenders, JIPS officers will supply information regarding offenders to local law enforcement agencies to enhance supervision and control. 
 
Exception: Departments in counties having a population of fewer than 300,000 persons may apply for a waiver with the Administrative Office of the Courts that may allow for JIPS probationers to be supervised by a single probation officer who supervises no more than 15 individuals.
 

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  Who operates JIPS?
  The Arizona Supreme Court is responsible for monitoring the JIPS programs in all 15 Arizona counties. Each locally operated program is custom-designed to utilize the resources and meet the special needs of the juveniles in that county.
 

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  JIPS by County
  Apache County (928) 337-4364
Mohave County (928) 753-0741 
Cochise County (520) 432-5458
Gila County (928) 425-8281
Navajo County (928) 524-4197 
Coconino County (928) 226-5400
Pima County (520) 740-2068 
Pinal County (520) 866-6469
Graham County (928) 428-3955
Santa Cruz County (520) 761-7854 
Greenlee County (928) 865-4184
Yavapai County (928) 771-3156 
La Paz County (928) 669-6188
Yuma County (928) 314-1900 
Maricopa County (602) 506-4011
 

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