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Interactive Data Dashboards

Data dashboards, also known as data visualizations, identify court trends and can serve as a valuable resource. These dashboards offer the chance to compare and analyze court data – from court caseload statistics to filings and terminations, financial data, judicial productivity credits, and more. This information is made available to members of the public for informational purposes only. The information is reflective of the stored data at the time of posting, and is subject to change.

Access Research & Statistics Records:

The interactive dashboard provides the number of filings and case resolutions for criminal and civil cases by fiscal year for each of the superior courts in every county.
The interactive dashboard provides the number of filings and case resolutions across criminal, traffic and civil cases by fiscal year for all municipal and justice courts within the state.
As specified by Arizona Revised Statute 22-125, JPCs are used to determine the annual salary of Justices of the Peace (judges) who preside over the justice courts. The interactive dashboard provides number of credits by county or court.
The interactive dashboard, which was temporarily created for the pandemic period, provides year-over-year monthly percent change projections, between 2020 and 2019, for revenue generated by municipal and justice courts, as well as by the Superior Court. The temporary interactive dashboard, which was created for the pandemic period, provides year-over-year monthly percent change projections, between 2020 and 2019, in the number of traffic violations filed in municipal or justice courts. The interactive dashboards provide the number of justice court eviction filings and eviction rates by fiscal year and county since 2008, as well as year-over-year monthly comparisons in the number of evictions (a) filed since FY 2017, (b) between CY 2020 and CY 2019, and (c) by manner of disposition since FY 2019.


The greatest value of a picture


is when it forces us to notice 


what we never expected to see.

– JOHN W. TUKEY