Court Improvement Program


The Court Improvement Program is designed to assess and improve court proceedings regarding foster care and adoption and to help maintain the focus on a child's safety, permanency and well-being. The Omnibus Budget and Reconciliation Act of 1993 made grant funding available to all states for use in improving their juvenile justice systems.  The grants were designed in recognition of the overwhelming pressures on juvenile courts including:
  • pidly escalating judicial caseloads;
  • more difficult cases; and
  • growing complexity of the litigation itself.

The funding was designed to first enable state court systems to carry out an accurate assessment of their functioning, and then to develop and implement a plan that insures that both the spirit and the letter of recent reforms are in place for children.

                                                                                         

January was first declared as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month in 2010. Since then, January has been a time to acknowledge those experiencing enslavement and those who have escaped. Although slavery is commonly thought to be a thing of the past, human traffickers generate hundreds of billions of dollars in profits by trapping millions of people in horrific situations around the world, including here in the U.S. Traffickers use violence, threats, deception, debt bondage, and other manipulative tactics to force people to engage in commercial sex or to provide labor or services against their will.

In recognition of this important topic, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) has compiled a list of resources for children, teens, parents and caregivers, educators, child welfare and juvenile justice professionals, and mental health providers.